Drinking tea to relieve stress

Today is International Stress Awareness Day. Halloween is over and it’s time to start preparing for Thanksgiving. Before you know it, the holiday season will be in full swing and even the most optimistic, cheerful person may begin to feel stressed out.

We had the opportunity to get some really helpful tips from holistic physician and best-selling author, Dr. Bradley Nelson. You may be familiar with Dr. Nelson’s book, The Emotion Code.

We really found his tips to be helpful to us and wanted to share some of his expertise with you — afterall, who can’t relate to feelings of stress?

tea helps relieves stress

How to Manage Stress: 3 Tips from Dr. Nelson

1. Plan ahead and be flexible about your expectations. Think about your plans for the upcoming holidays. Everyone else has expectations and sometimes they won’t match with yours. Plan for spontaneity. If you allow the plans that others have to be a part of what brings you joy, you’ll have more fun as everyone shares ideas and activities. Be the one who makes the holidays fun for others and it will be more joyful for you.

2. Be aware of what your body needs. This includes healthy food, plenty of water, rest and exercise. So don’t throw your routines out the window when you’re on vacation. Get plenty of exercise so you’ll feel good. Continue eating healthy. You’ll feel better about yourself if you’re really taking care of your body!

3. Decide to take care of yourself emotionally. You may need specific things such as the emotional support of a spouse, a lunch date with a friend or even just some time alone. Decide how busy you want to be ­– or not be! Say “no” to trying to do too much if it interferes with your health, family time or if it feels like it’ll cause too much stress for you.

Can drinking tea help to reduce stress?

Dr.  Nelson touched upon the need to eat healthy foods and to drink lots of water. Let’s discuss, though, how tea specifically, can help.

  • The ritual of drinking tea — whether it be a regular afternoon tea, tea before bedtime or while you read the morning paper — helps alleviate stress. Andy Puddicombe, mindfulness expert and co-founder of Headspace, shares that when you build a ritual around your tea drinking experience, you are promoting zen.
  • Brad Camp, CIP and founder of Breathe Life Healing Center, explains that drinking tea promotes a sense of calm because the aroma of the natural ingredients acts as a mood booster.
  • There is more. Amy Weschler’s book, The Mind-Beauty Connection: 9 Days to Less Stress, Gorgeous Skin, and a Whole New You addresses more health benefits of tea when it comes to reducing stress —

 “Any warm drink is a super stress soother, and curling up with a cup of aromatic jasmine tea can make the whole day go away. But with tea, it’s not just the warmth at work. Skin-friendly tea also has two magic antistress ingredients: L-theanine, an amino acid that produces a relaxed but alert frame of mind, and catechins, antioxidants that, among other things, lower corticosterone, a stress hormone.”

Which teas are best for stress relief?

You will likely feel more calm and less stressed after enjoying any flavor of tea. If you are not sure where to begin, try chamomile or peppermint.

There is some solid scientific research about the many benefits of chamomile tea when it comes to stress relief.

Peppermint tea is also believed to be a great stress reliever. In a study funded by NASA, the aroma of peppermint affected study volunteers who reported a 20 percent reduction in feelings of  fatigue and anxiety.

We should note that it is important  to source certified organic Peppermint that is grown in the USA. Our peppermint tea features domestic organic peppermint, which is sourced from a family herb farm where there is much care to insure the quality from growing, to harvesting to drying.

Pour yourself a cup of stress relief. Be well!

 

Sources:

Srivastava, J.K., Shankar, E., & Gupta, S. (2010). Chamomile: A herbal medicine of the past with a bright future (Review). Molecular Medicine Reports, 3, 895-901. https://doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2010.377

American Chemical Society. (2005, January 4). Chamomile Tea: New Evidence Supports Health Benefits ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 1, 2017 from http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/01/050104112140.htm

North American Journal of Psychology . 2009, Vol. 11 Issue 2, p245-256. 12p. 2 Charts, 1 Graph.

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